Reviews of Peer-Reviewed Journals in the Humanities and Social Sciences

We give you the scuttlebutt on academic journals—aiding you in selecting the right journal for publication—in reviews that are sometimes snarky, sometimes lengthy, always helpful. Written by Princeton University graduate students and Wendy Laura Belcher.

French Forum

For those interested in publishing articles on French and Francophone Literature and films of all periods but preferably post-1900.

Founded by Virginia and Raymond La Charité, French Forum is published by the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania. They publish articles in both French and English, but there seem to be a few more articles in French rather than English. There seems to be an interest in publishing articles on not only canonical works (e.g., La Peste by Camus), but also on newer works (e.g,. Le Dieu du Carnage by Yasmina Reza). 19th– and 20th– century works seem to mostly feature in the titles of the published articles, but there are articles published about works from other centuries. The journal also seems to strive to include at least one or two articles on a Francophone writer/work per issue. The journal also purports to “[welcome] a multiplicity of approaches,” thus the articles published seem to make use of a variety of approaches and methodologies. Close reading seems to be a favored method. As for who is published in the journal, a number of graduate students have been published in the journal, as well as well-established professors. Article titles are straightforward and plainly state what the article will discuss. The journal is a great source for scholarly articles on lesser known contemporary French/Francophone writers and filmmakers, as well as articles on post-colonial studies.  The journal welcomes all kinds of disciplines and approaches towards literary and film works.

Useful for Submission

Word Count:  At least 4,500 words, but not more than 6,500 words (including notes and bibliography)

Issues per year: 2, although in 2017 FF published three issues (their website says published “triannually,” but they only published three issues in 2017; all other years have had two published issues

Current volume number: Vol. 43, Number 2, Fall 2018

Articles per year: on average, about 20

Fall 2018: 11 articles (3 book reviews)

Spring 2018:  10 articles (3 book reviews)

Winter 2017: 10 articles (5 book reviews)

Fall 2017: 9 articles (3 book reviews)

Spring 2017: 13 articles (2 interviews and 5 book reviews)

Winter 2016: 9 articles (6 book reviews)

Summer/Fall 2016: 12 articles (7 book reviews)

Spring/Fall 2015: 10 articles (6 book reviews)

Winter 2015: 10 articles (4 book reviews)

Spring/Fall 2014: 13 articles (5 book reviews)

Winter 2014: 10 articles (4 book reviews)

Citation style: No preferred citation style is listed in “Submission Information,” but the articles seem to all make use of MLA

Abstract length (if required): Yes, 200-250 words

Upcoming special issues (if available): None currently listed

Relevant Editors: Philippe Met (Editor-in-Chief) and Andrea Goulet (Review Editor)

Open access?: No, one can either subscribe or must have institutional access to Project Muse.

Online?: Yes, all content available through Project Muse

Bibliography (articles in the journal consulted for this review)

Cooke, Roderick. “Theorizing the Scapegoat in Maupassant and Zola.” French Forum, vol. 41 no. 3,           2016, pp. 177-191. Project MUSEdoi:10.1353/frf.2016.0028

Smith, Macs. “What Dies in the Street: Camus’s La Peste and Infected Networks.” French Forum, vol. 41 3, 2016, pp. 193-208. Project MUSEdoi:10.1353/frf.2016.0020

Analysis of a published journal article: Smith, Macs. “What Dies in the Street: Camus’s La Peste and Infected Networks.” French Forum, vol. 41 no. 3, 2016, pp. 193-208. Project MUSEdoi:10.1353/frf.2016.0020

 

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This entry was posted on May 21, 2017 in French studies journals, Humanities Journals, Literary Studies Journals.
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